Canadian Wildlife

Unusually High Trap Catches of a Snake Egg Parasitoid, Nicrophorus pustulatus (Coleoptera: Silphidae) in the Frontenac Axis Population of Gray Ratsnake Pantherophis spiloides

Posted on Nov 2, 2016

Author Michael G. C. BROWN and David V. BERESFORD CWBM 5 (2): 25-31. Correspondence: M. G. C. Brown, Environmental and Life Sciences, Trent University, 2140 East Bank Drive, Peterborough, Ontario, K9J 7B8, Canada. Email: michbrown@trentu.ca Abstract Nicrophorus pustulatus was recently identified as a parasitoid of eggs of gray ratsnake (Pantherophis spiloides), northern ringneck snake (Diadophis punctatus) and eastern fox snake (Elaphe gloydi). We sampled Nicrophorus spp. near gray ratsnake hibernacula in the Frontenac Axis region, Ontario, using carrion-baited aerial traps set 6 m...

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Habitat Use by Harlequin Ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus) during Brood-rearing in the Rocky Mountains of Alberta

Posted on Nov 2, 2016

Author Beth MacCALLUM, Chiarastella FEDER, Barry GODSALVE, Marion I. PAIBOMESAI, and Allison PATTERSON CWBM 5 (2): 32-45. Correspondence: Beth MacCallum, Bighorn Wildlife Technologies Ltd., 176 Moberly Drive, Hinton, AB, T7V 1Z1, Canada. Email: ovis@bighornwildlife.com Abstract Prefledging waterfowl are vulnerable to an array of mortality agents and are often spatially restricted. Factors affecting habitat use by brood-rearing harlequin duck (Histrionicus histrionicus) females at the home range scale were investigated in the east slope of Alberta’s Rocky Mountains. Generalized linear models...

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Effects of Snowmachine Disturbance on the Energetics and Habitat Selection of Caribou (Rangifer tarandus) in Gros Morne National Park, Newfoundland

Posted on Nov 2, 2016

Author Shane P. MAHONEY, Keith P. LEWIS, Kim MAWHINNEY, Chris MCCARTHY, Scott TAYLOR, Doug ANIONS, James A. SCHAEFER, and David A. FIFIELD  CWBM 5 (2): 46-59. Correspondence: Shane Mahoney, Conservation Visions Inc., P.O Box 5489, Station C, 354 Water Street, St. John’s, Newfoundland, A1C 5W4, Canada. E-mail: shane@conservationvisions.com Abstract Caribou (Rangifer tarandus) and other northern ungulates are increasingly exposed to snowmachine activity, but the implications of such exposure for energetics and habitat use are not fully understood. We assessed the influence of snowmachine...

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New Publication – BADGERS: SYSTEMATICS, BIOLOGY, CONSERVATION, AND RESEARCH TECHNIQUES

Posted on Nov 2, 2016

The Most Comprehensive Reference For Badger Researchers & Managers, Mammalogists & Conservation Groups Available Now “Curated findings and discussions from the most recognized industry...

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Landscape of Fear for Naïve Prey: Ungulates Flee Protected Area to Avoid a Re-established Predator

Posted on May 17, 2016

Author Michelle M. BACON and Mark S. BOYCE Correspondence: Mark S. Boyce, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E9, Canada. Email: boyce@ualberta.ca Received 9 January 2016 – Accepted 18 March 2016 Abstract Populations of large carnivores are re-establishing in many areas, resulting in direct and indirect effects on prey that can influence community structure and create conflicts with humans. We documented the rapid return of cougars (Puma concolor) to an isolated, protected mountain range in southeast Alberta and southwest Saskatchewan, Canada,...

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Behavioural Responses of Moulting Barnacle Geese to Experimental Helicopter Noise and a Predator

Posted on May 17, 2016

Author Nicholas J. C. TYLER, Karl-Otto JACOBSEN, and Arnoldus S. BLIX Correspondence: Dr. N. J. C. Tyler, Centre for Sami Studies, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. Email: nicholas.tyler@uit.no Received 22 February 2016 – Accepted 11 April 2016 Abstract The response of animals to anthropogenic noise can be aggravated by lack of familiarity with its auditory pattern and also by nervousness characteristic of particular phases of their life cycle. Both conditions apply in the Arctic where human activity is highly localised and field operations, being largely restricted...

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