Canadian Wildlife

Causes of Mortality in Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) in The Canadian Maritime Provinces, 1991-2016

Posted on Nov 30, 2020

Author by Amélie MATHIEU, E. Jane PARMLEY, Scott MCBURNEY, Colin ROBERTSON, Helene VAN DONINCK, and Pierre-Yves DAOUST CWBM 9 (2): 159-173. Correspondence: Pierre-Yves Daoust, Canadian Wildlife Health Cooperative, Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, 550 University Avenue, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, C1A 4P3, Canada. Email: daoust@upei.ca Abstract This article summarizes the results of necropsy findings on 420 bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) from the 3 Canadian Maritime provinces over a 26-yr period. It...

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Aligning Coyote and Human Welfare

Posted on Nov 30, 2020

Author by Alexandra BOESEL and Shelley ALEXANDER CWBM 9 (2): 152-158. Correspondence: Alexandra Boesel, University of Calgary, Earth Science Building, Canid Conservation Lab, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4, Canada. Email: Alexandra.boesel1@ucalgary.ca Abstract Coyotes (Canis latrans) have adapted and learned to live alongside humans but not without cost. Seen as a pest, nuisance or biosecurity threat, coyotes often receive indirect or direct violence from the communities they live alongside with. It is our position that the values and behaviours justifying violence...

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On the Use of Den and Resting Site Terminology for Species in the Martes Complex

Posted on Nov 30, 2020

Author by Jean-François ROBITAILLE, Gilbert PROULX, and Emmanuel DO LINH SAN CWBM 9 (2): 137-151. Correspondence: Jean-François Robitaille, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, P3E 2C6, Canada. Email: jfrobitaille@laurentian.ca Abstract We review den and resting site terminology used in 121 scientific publications related to species of the subfamily Guloninae (hereafter Martes Complex, sensu Proulx and Aubry 2017). These indicate that the term den has been used both to describe structures used by females to give birth and/or raise their kits, or by both sexes to sleep or rest. The term...

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A Primer on Novel Strains of Echinococcus Multilocularis for Canadian Wildlife Biologists

Posted on Nov 30, 2020

Author by Monika K. MIERZEJEWSKI, Collin J. HORN, and Kinga KOWALEWSKA-GROCHOWSKA CWBM 9 (2): 132-136. Correspondence: Monika K. Mierzejewski, University of Alberta, Faculty of Nursing, 116 St & 85 Ave, Edmonton Clinic Health Academy, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 1C9, Canada. Email: mmierzej@ualberta.ca  Abstract Echinococcus multilocularis is the causative agent of alveolar echinococcosis, causing approximately 18,000 new cases each year. E. multilocularis is widespread with distinct strains in Europe, Asia, and North America. Recently, a mutant European type strain was detected in North...

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Long-term Snow Track Monitoring to Understand Factors Affecting Boreal Forest Mammal Density in an Expanding In Situ Oil Sands Area

Posted on Nov 30, 2020

Author by Hans Gaute SKATTER, John Leonard KANSAS, Michael Lawrence CHARLEBOIS, and Sondre SKATTER CWBM 9 (2): 107-131. Correspondence: Hans Gaute Skatter, Omnia Ecological Services, 722-27th Avenue Northwest, Calgary, Alberta, T2M 2J3, Canada. Email: hskatter@omniaeco.ca Abstract Oil sands development in Alberta, Canada, results in a uniquely fragmented landscape characterized by a high-density of linear features and fewer polygonal disturbance features. Uncertainty remains concerning the effects of this type of industrial footprint on boreal mammal species and communities. We examined...

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Mesopredator Community Dynamics along a Gradient of Landscape Disturbance in Riparian Corridors of Central Pennsylvania, USA

Posted on Nov 30, 2020

Author by Andrew T. TOWNSEND, Joseph A. BISHOP, Thomas L. SERFASS and Robert P. BROOKS CWBM 9 (2): 88-106. Correspondence: Riparia, Department of Geography, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, 16802, USA. Email: atownsend.penn@gmail.com Abstract A human-induced global decline of apex predators resulted in the “release” of smaller mesopredators. These mesopredators exhibit different relationships with landscape disturbance than do their apex cousins. This study sampled predator use of riparian corridor disturbance gradients to examine the relationships between...

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