Canadian Wildlife

Successful Predator Conservation Must Rely on Scientific Evidence, Effective Management Approaches, and Professionalism

Posted on May 2, 2018

Author by Gilbert PROULX CWBM 7 (1): 1–2. Correspondence: Alpha Wildlife Research & Management Ltd., 229 Lilac Terrace, Sherwood Park, Alberta, T8H 1W3, Canada. Email: gproulx@alphawildlife.ca   View Full-Text    Download...

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A Meta-analysis of Animal Survival Following Translocation: Comparisons Between Conflict and Conservation Efforts

Posted on May 2, 2018

Author by Blake STUPARYK, Collin J. HORN, Sofia KARABATSOS, and Josue ARTEAGA TORRES CWBM 7 (1): 3–17 Correspondence: Collin J. Horn, University of Alberta, Department of Biological Sciences, 11455 Saskatchewan Drive, CW 405, Biological Sciences Building, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2E9, Canada. Email: chorn@ualberta.ca Abstract Wildlife management balances conservation goals with meeting societal objectives. It incorporates scientific disciplines such as ecology, animal behaviour, geography, and sociology to determine management practices and make policy recommendations. Two major areas of...

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Should Grizzly Bears be Hunted or Protected? Social and Organizational Affiliations Influence Scientific Judgments

Posted on May 2, 2018

Author by Gabriel R. KARNS, Alexander HEEREN, Eric L. TOMAN, Robyn S. WILSON, Harmony K. SZAREK, and Jeremy T. BRUSKOTTER CWBM 7 (1): 18–30 Correspondence: Gabriel R. Karns, School of Environment and Natural Resources, The Ohio State University, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, Ohio, 43210 USA. Email: karns.36@osu.edu Abstract Accelerating threats to biodiversity increases the number of species requiring listing status judgments under the United States Endangered Species Act. Understanding that complex environments allow for heuristics to influence (and perhaps bias) cognitive decision processes,...

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Is Livestock an Important Food Resource for Coyotes and Wolves in Central Eastern Alberta Counties with Predator Control Bounties?

Posted on May 2, 2018

Author by Gilbert PROULX and Sadie PARR CWBM 7 (1): 31–45 Correspondence: Gilbert Proulx, Alpha Wildlife Research & Management, 229 Lilac Terrace, Sherwood Park, Alberta, T8H 1W3, Canada.  Email: gproulx@alphawildlife.ca Abstract Although bounties are known to be an ineffective management practice to address human-carnivore conflicts, they are maintained by some Alberta rural municipalities (counties) to ostensibly reduce livestock predation by coyotes (Canis latrans) and wolves (Canis lupus). However, there are no data ascertaining these municipalities’ claims that livestock is an...

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Use of Non-invasive Genetics to Generate Core-Area Population Estimates of a Threatened Predator in the Superior National Forest, USA

Posted on May 2, 2018

Author by Shannon BARBER-MEYER, Daniel RYAN, David GROSSHUESCH, Timothy CATTON, Sarah MALICK-WAHLS CWBM 7 (1): 46–55 Correspondence: Shannon Barber-Meyer, USGS, 1393 Hwy 169, Ely, Minnesota, 55731 USA.  Email: sbarber-meyer@usgs.gov Abstract Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) are found in boreal forests of Canada and Alaska and range southward into the contiguous United States. Much less is understood about lynx in their southern range compared to northern populations. Because lynx are currently listed as threatened under the US Endangered Species Act but have recently been recommended for...

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Concerns About Mammal Predator Killing Programs: Scientific Evidence and Due Diligence

Posted on May 2, 2018

Author by Gilbert PROULX CWBM 7 (1): 56–66 Abstract The implementation of mammal predator killing programs is highly controversial and deserves discussion within the scientific community. In this opinion paper, I use specific examples to discuss the whys and hows of programs aimed at: 1) ensuring human safety and health; 2) addressing concerns of interest groups; and 3) safeguarding native and endangered species. Successful programs share some commonalities: they focus on the main factor that is responsible for the problematic situation and on culprit animals, and they are developed with an...

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