Canadian Wildlife

Lack of Evidence of Cattle Depredation by a Small Pack of Wolves of the Cooking Lake-Blackfoot Provincial Recreation Area in East-Central Alberta

Posted on May 15, 2020

Author by Gilbert PROULX and Kimberley A. VILLENEUVE CWBM 9 (1): 1–11 Correspondence: Gilbert Proulx, Alpha Wildlife Research & Management Ltd., 229 Lilac Terrace, Sherwood Park, Alberta, T8H 1W3, Canada. Email: gproulx@alphawildlife.ca Abstract In east-central Alberta, livestock producers consider that wolves (Canis lupus) inhabiting the Cooking Lake-Blackfoot Provincial Recreation Area (thereafter referred as the Blackfoot Recreation Area), where forests are interspersed with pastures and farms, are a threat to cattle (Bos taurus). In order to better understand the wolf-producers...

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Testing Environmental DNA from Wolf Snow Tracks for Species, Sex, and Individual Identification

Posted on May 15, 2020

Author by Shannon M. BARBER-MEYER, Joseph C. DYSTHE, and Kristine L. PILGRIM CWBM 9 (1): 12–20 Correspondence: Shannon M. Beyer-Meyer, postal address: U. S. Geological Survey, 1393 Hwy 169, Ely, Minnesota, 55731, USA. Email: sbarber-meyer@usgs.gov Abstract Monitoring elusive, relatively low-density, large predators, such as the grey wolf (Canis lupus), has often been accomplished by live-capture and radiocollaring. Increasingly, non-invasive methods are considered best practice whenever it is possible to use them. Recently, environmental DNA (eDNA) deposited in snow tracks was demonstrated...

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Assessing Ungulate Populations in Temperate North America

Posted on May 15, 2020

Author by Rob FOUND and Brent R. PATTERSON CWBM 9 (1): 21–42 Correspondence: Rob Found, Parks Canada, Elk Island National Park, 1 – 54401 Range Road 203, Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta, T8L 0V3, Canada. Email: rob.found@canada.ca Abstract Ungulates are among the most intensively managed wildlife in North America because they are both keystone and umbrella species, and because of their importance as game species for subsistence and sport hunters. To manage ungulate populations effectively, wildlife managers must employ survey methods that can provide population estimations that are accurate...

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A Biologist’s walk among bears by Barrie K. Gilbert ̶ Reviewed by Stephen F. Stringham / Speaking of Bears: The Bear Crisis and a Tale of Rewilding from Yosemite, Sequoia and Other National Parks by Rachel Mazur ̶ Reviewed by Stephen F. Stringham

Posted on May 15, 2020

Book Reviews CWBM 9 (1): 43-45 Book-Reviews   View Full-Text    Download...

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CWBM & COVID-19 / IN MEMORIAM ̶ Dr. Francis R. Cook (1935 ̶ 2020)

Posted on May 15, 2020

Author by Gilbert PROULX CWBM 9 (1): 46 NEWS   View Full-Text    Download...

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Declines in Muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus) Population Density in Prince Edward Island, Canada

Posted on Oct 30, 2019

Author by Garry J. GREGORY, Randy DIBBLEE, Pierre-Yves DAOUST, and Michael R. VAN DEN HEUVEL CWBM 8 (2): 46–60 Correspondence: Mike van den Heuvel, Department of Biology, University of Prince Edward Island, 550 University Avenue, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, C0A 1C0, Canada. Email: mheuvel@upei.ca Abstract Muskrats (Ondatra zibethicus) are the most abundant furbearer on Prince Edward Island (PEI) and a cornerstone of the trapping industry in the province. In the past 10-20 yrs, trappers have reported declines in muskrat density in areas that have traditionally been much more...

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