Humaneness and Selectivity of Killing Neck Snares Used to Capture Canids in Canada: A Review

Posted on Dec 16, 2014

Author

Gilbert PROULX, Dwight RODTKA, Morley W. BARRETT, Marc CATTET, Dick DEKKER, Erin MOFFATT, Roger A. POWELL

Correspondence: Gilbert Proulx, Alpha Wildlife Research & Management Ltd., 229 Lilac Terrace, Sherwood Park Alberta, T8H 1W3, Canada. Email: gproulx@alphawildlife.ca

Submitted 4 November 2014 – Accepted 16 December 2014


Abstract

Although killing neck snares are used on traplines in Canada to capture gray wolves (Canis lupus), coyotes (C. latrans), and red foxes (Vulpes vulpes), they are not subject to trap performance criteria set out in the Agreement on International Humane Trapping Standards (AIHTS).  This paper reviews scientific information related to the humaneness and selectivity of killing neck snares used to capture canids.  All past studies demonstrated that manual and power killing neck snares were inadequate to consistently and quickly render canids unconscious.  Furthermore, killing neck snares are non-selective, and impact seriously on the welfare of non-target animals.  We recommend that the AIHTS be modified to allow only killing neck snares that kill quickly and consistently, and in the absence of such snares, to phase-out all killing snares for which efficient and more humane alternatives exist.

Key Words: Canis latrans, Canis lupus, Coyote, Gray Wolf, Humaneness, Killing Neck Snares, Red Fox, Standards, Trapping, Vulpes vulpes.

 

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